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Home2021-03-19T14:55:42-05:00

Welcome to Harris County Water Control and Improvement District No. 145

Welcome to the website for Harris County Water Control and Improvement District No. 145 (the “District”). The District through the dedication of its Directors and Consultants, is committed to maintaining the channels and trails within its jurisdiction.

The District services the neighborhoods of Northmead Village, Middlegate Village, Easton Commons, Wheatstone Village Copperstone, Southcreek Village, Copperfield Place, Southdown Village, Southdown Estates and Southpoint.

Hurricane Preparedness 2022

Be ready for hurricane season. Today you can determine your personal hurricane risk, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone, and review/update insurance policies. You can also make a list of items to replenish hurricane emergency supplies and start thinking about how you will prepare your home for the coming hurricane season. If you live in hurricane-prone areas, you are encouraged to complete these simple preparations before hurricane season begins on June 1.


Find out today what types of wind and water hazards could happen where you live, and then start preparing how to handle them. Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. impacts from wind and water can be felt hundreds of miles inland, and significant impacts can occur regardless of the storm’s strength. Know if you live in an area prone to flooding and if you’re safe to remain in your home.


Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone. You may also need to leave if you live in a flood prone area or in a mobile home outside a hurricane evacuation zone. Now is the time to begin planning where you would go and how you would get there.

You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Your destination could be a friend or relative who lives in a well built home outside flood prone areas. Remember, your safest place may be to remain home. Be sure to account for your pets in your plan.

As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


Whether you’re evacuating or sheltering-in-place, you’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of 3 days (store a longer than 3-day supply of water, if possible). Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You may need a portable crank or solar-powered USB charger for your cell phones.

If you need to go to a public shelter, follow health guidelines from your local officials and the CDC.


Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough insurance to repair or even replace your home and/or belongings. Remember, home and renters insurance doesn’t cover flooding, so you’ll need a separate policy for it.

Flood insurance is available through your company, agent, or the National Flood Insurance Program at floodsmart.gov. Act now, as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.


Whether you’re evacuating, or planning to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications to withstand wind impacts. Many retrofits are not as costly or time consuming as you may think.

Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.

If you’re a renter, work with your landlord now to prepare your home for a storm.


Many people rely on their neighbors before and after a disaster, and there are many ways you can help them. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes.

Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but remember you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions.

Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know who issues evacuation orders for your area, determine locations on where you will ride out the storm, and start to get your supplies now. Being prepared before a hurricane threatens makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between being a hurricane victim or a hurricane survivor.

By |May 11th, 2022|

Graffiti

WASTED TAX DOLLARS

Once again we are reminding residents of the continual problem we have with graffiti appearing throughout Copperfield. In the past four months alone, the District has spent over $11,352.00 for removing and maintaining areas where it appears. Due to excessive and constant removal, some areas now need to be redone with our anti graffiti coating. This coating does not prevent paint from adhering but aids in its removal. The cost of this coating creates another added drain on your tax dollars.

If you see someone, hear of someone committing this crime, please contact the non-emergency number at the Sheriff’s office (713-221-6000).

According to state law regarding vandalism and intentionally painting on property:

  • Class “C” – misdemeanor if the pecuniary loss is less than $100.
  • Class “B” – $100 or more but less than $750.
  • Class “A” – $750. or more but less that $2,500.

Anything above this amount is considered a felony. The graffiti removed from the trails last week fell in the Class “A” category. The police are notified and/or a police report is filed with each incident.

Please remind everyone, if caught, there will be ramifications and fines. Your tax dollars could be put to better use than rectifying the willful acts of a few individuals. Thank you

“See something – Say something.”

By |February 17th, 2022|

Scoop The Poop

Stop disease-causing bacteria in its tracks, by keeping our waterways clean. Do your part by cleaning up after your dogs! It is appalling to see the trails littered with dog poop. Soon it will start getting darker earlier. Your fellow trail users would appreciate a clean trail when they go walking or bike riding especially at dusk and early morning. Bags are provided to facilitate removal if you forgot to bring one with you.

At home:

  • Pick up every poop
  • Bag it
  • Put it in the trash
  • Repeat weekly

Away from home:

  • Always bring bags
  • Pick up every poop
  • Bag it
  • Put it in the trash

Veterinarians, garbage collectors and health professionals all agree that the trash is the safest way to dispose of your dog’s poop. Dog droppings left on grass wash into our storm drains, increasing the level of bacteria and making waterways unsafe for swimming and fishing.

By |October 13th, 2021|

Tree Limbs and Debris in Bayou

Please do not throw tree limbs and other debris on the tops and sides of the bayou. Your tax payer dollars and that of your neighbors has to pay for their removal. This is money that can be used to maintain the trails and bayous. The limbs need to be cut in 3 or 4 foot lengths, bundled and placed at the curb on your regular trash days. Other yard debris needs to be bagged and placed at the curb also.

These simple things can make it more pleasurable for all the residents to enjoy our trails and the better use of your tax dollars.

By |October 13th, 2021|

Bayou Blockage

Building an obstacle to block the flow of water in the bayous is illegal. Recently this dam/walkway was found near one of the bridges. It cost taxpayer dollars to have it dismantled. Please refrain from creating any impediment with any material anywhere that disrupts the continual course of the water.

If you observe anyone attempting to build such obstacle or one already in place, please contact authorities or H2O Consulting.

By |March 22nd, 2021|

Maintaining the Bayous

Residents: Harris County Flood Control has given WCID 145 the task of maintaining the bayous within our district. Please do not plant bushes, trees, gardens, etc. in this area. The mowers should not have to go around these obstacles. Any such plantings will be removed by the District.

Thank you for your cooperation.

By |April 21st, 2020|

District Trail Map

With so many people home at this time and spending time outside, we’d like to highlight the trails in the community.

By |March 17th, 2020|

Drainage Network Repairs & Debris Removal

In response to the historic flooding from Hurricane Harvey, the Harris County Flood Control District has embarked on a county-wide assessment of all of our bayous, creeks, channels and stormwater detention basins. The purpose of this assessment is to identify damages caused by the flooding and to prioritize them for immediate and future repairs.

View Interactive Map
By |October 17th, 2019|

No Motorized Vehicles Beyond This Point

It is against the law to ride any motorized vehicles on the bayous throughout Copperfield. Not only is it a nuisance to residents backing up to the bayous but it can damage the trails and/or the channels that keep our area from flooding. As a reminder, there is a fine imposed if caught.

If you see someone using a motorized vehicle on the trail, please call the Sheriff’s non emergency number (713) 221-6000 and report it.

By |July 3rd, 2019|
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