Hurricane Preparedness 2022

Be ready for hurricane season. Today you can determine your personal hurricane risk, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone, and review/update insurance policies. You can also make a list of items to replenish hurricane emergency supplies and start thinking about how you will prepare your home for the coming hurricane season. If you live in hurricane-prone areas, you are encouraged to complete these simple preparations before hurricane season begins on June 1.


Find out today what types of wind and water hazards could happen where you live, and then start preparing how to handle them. Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. impacts from wind and water can be felt hundreds of miles inland, and significant impacts can occur regardless of the storm’s strength. Know if you live in an area prone to flooding and if you’re safe to remain in your home.


Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone. You may also need to leave if you live in a flood prone area or in a mobile home outside a hurricane evacuation zone. Now is the time to begin planning where you would go and how you would get there.

You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Your destination could be a friend or relative who lives in a well built home outside flood prone areas. Remember, your safest place may be to remain home. Be sure to account for your pets in your plan.

As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


Whether you’re evacuating or sheltering-in-place, you’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of 3 days (store a longer than 3-day supply of water, if possible). Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You may need a portable crank or solar-powered USB charger for your cell phones.

If you need to go to a public shelter, follow health guidelines from your local officials and the CDC.


Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough insurance to repair or even replace your home and/or belongings. Remember, home and renters insurance doesn’t cover flooding, so you’ll need a separate policy for it.

Flood insurance is available through your company, agent, or the National Flood Insurance Program at floodsmart.gov. Act now, as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.


Whether you’re evacuating, or planning to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications to withstand wind impacts. Many retrofits are not as costly or time consuming as you may think.

Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.

If you’re a renter, work with your landlord now to prepare your home for a storm.


Many people rely on their neighbors before and after a disaster, and there are many ways you can help them. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes.

Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but remember you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions.

Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know who issues evacuation orders for your area, determine locations on where you will ride out the storm, and start to get your supplies now. Being prepared before a hurricane threatens makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between being a hurricane victim or a hurricane survivor.

By |2022-10-26T15:26:20-05:00May 11th, 2022|Archive|

Holiday Update – 11/18/2021

With the holidays upon us we would like to remind you that fireworks are NOT allowed on the bayous.  It is posted on the signs leading to our trails.  Unfortunately some residents disobey this rule hence the reminder.  We are aware they are allowed in Harris County but the bayous are off bounds.  Please abide by this simple rule.  If you are aware of someone using fireworks on the bayous, you can contact the non-emergency number for the Sheriff’s office.  Please be aware though that they are very busy during the holidays and might not be able to respond in a timely manner.   Thank you for your cooperation.

By |2022-01-04T00:03:04-06:00November 22nd, 2021|Archive|

Sidewalk and Trail Repairs

We are pleased to announce the trail repairs behind the new construction of the Stonecreek facility (where the racquet club was previously) have been completed.

Also, Harris County has finished the sidewalk and trail repairs near Lowery Elementary.

We thank you for your patience and hope you will enjoy having the uninterrupted trail system again. With cooler weather soon, it will be the perfect time to explore our community and enjoy the outdoors!

By |2021-12-15T13:03:19-06:00August 18th, 2021|Archive|

REMINDER!

It has been brought to our attention that a resident was using fireworks on the bayou this past July Fourth. This is illegal as posted on the signs leading to the trails. Please be considerate and obey the rules established for our trail network.

By |2021-12-15T13:01:16-06:00July 9th, 2021|Archive|

Stonecreek Project Update 6/14/2021

The Stonecreek project bordering the trail network may have disrupted the pattern you have been accustomed to walking/riding. We are working with our consultants to ensure they replace the panels to our standards and employ any safety measures for the overflow slab. We apologize for the inconvenience. The rainy weather has slowed down their progress but, hopefully, it will be completed soon.

By |2021-07-14T08:00:30-05:00June 14th, 2021|Archive|

Updates- 4/26/2021

We are in the process of doing a major trimming of all the trees along the bayous to facilitate maintenance and grass cutting. It will take approximately a week to a week and a half depending on the weather. We apologize for any inconvenience this might cause.

The repairs to the trails have been completed. The contractors are presently working on filling in around the slabs and cleaning up any excess debris. We hope you are enjoying this beautiful weather while walking/riding on the trails throughout our neighborhood.

By |2021-06-14T21:36:14-05:00April 26th, 2021|Archive|

Hurricane Preparedness 2021

Be ready for hurricane season. Today you can determine your personal hurricane risk, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone, and review/update insurance policies. You can also make a list of items to replenish hurricane emergency supplies and start thinking about how you will prepare your home for the coming hurricane season. If you live in hurricane-prone areas, you are encouraged to complete these simple preparations before hurricane season begins on June 1.  Keep in mind, you may need to adjust any preparedness actions based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


Find out today what types of wind and water hazards could happen where you live, and then start preparing how to handle them. Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. Their impacts can be felt hundreds of miles inland, and significant impacts can occur without it being a major hurricane.


The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone.  If you do, now is the time to begin planning where you would go and how you would get there. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles, but have multiple options. Your destination could be a friend or relative who doesn’t live in an evacuation zone.  If you live in a well-built home outside the evacuation zone, your safest place may be to remain home.  Be sure to account for your pets in your plan.  As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


You’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of three days. Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You may need a portable crank or solar-powered USB charger for your cell phones.

If you need to go to a public shelter, the CDC recommends bringing items that can help protect you and others from COVID-19, such as hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, bar or liquid soap, disinfectant wipes (if available) and two masks for each person. (Children under two years old and people having trouble breathing should not wear face coverings.)


Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home. Don’t forget coverage for your car or boat. Remember, standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding. Whether you’re a homeowner or renter, you’ll need a separate policy for it, and it’s available through your company, agent or the National Flood Insurance Program at floodsmart.gov. Act now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.


If you plan to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Many retrofits are not as costly or time consuming as you may think. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.


Many Americans rely on their neighbors after a disaster, but there are also many ways you can help your neighbors before a hurricane approaches. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes. Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but remember you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions. Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know who issues evacuation orders for your area, determine locations on where you will ride out the storm, and start to get your supplies now.  Being prepared before a hurricane threatens makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between being a hurricane victim or a hurricane survivor.

By |2021-11-30T11:41:55-06:00April 18th, 2021|Archive|

Trail Updates- 3/19/2021

We have just received notification the repairs to trails will begin Saturday, March 20th. It will be done in five phases. Each phase will be completed before moving on to the next phase. Hopefully this will limit the need to completely redo your usual route. Barring any unforeseen delays, the concrete work will be completed by mid-May. The target completion date for the total project is sometime in early June. If you would like to follow the progress of this project, below is a map of the areas effected with the different phases marked.

Parts of the trail will be blocked off where the repairs are taking place. Please be considerate and avoid the areas that are blocked off. Also, it is a definite safety issue. They will try and complete the project as quickly as possible. Your cooperation will be very much appreciated. We are very enthused to see how many residents are utilizing our trail system. Our goal is to maintain them to the utmost, to ensure your safety and enjoyment.

By |2021-04-22T18:32:47-05:00March 19th, 2021|Archive|

Freeze Watch

Harris County WCID 145 residents, it is time to prepare for colder temperatures! There is a Freeze Watch in effect for Sunday night through Tuesday morning, February 14th – February 16, 2021. Temperatures are expected to drop to freezing levels overnight.

How can District residents prepare? Practice the “Four P’s” as the cold fronts set in:

People:

  • Dress in warm clothing, wear coats and gloves when outdoors.
  • Protect children and the elderly. Never leave them in a cold place or vehicle.
  • Temperatures are predicted to be in the teens Monday night and Tuesday morning.

Pets:

  • Bring your pets indoors.
  • Provide a warm, safe place for them to eat and sleep.

Pipes:

  • Prevent frozen pipes and damage to your home by opening the cabinets under the kitchen and bathroom sinks to allow warm air to circulate and warm the pipes.
  • Insulate outdoor faucets and exposed pipes and be sure to disconnect and drain hoses from outdoor spigots.

Plants:

  • Protect plants from freezing by covering them with plant-cover fabric, or a light blanket with plastic sheeting on top of it.
  • Hydrate plants early so they can absorb and stay healthy through the cold.

Additionally, there are a few vehicle-safety tips to observe during winter weather:

  • Keep your gas tank full.
  • Have tire pressure checked.
  • Have a phone charger, first aid kit, blankets, and jumper cables in your car.
  • Check local road conditions at www.houstontranstar.org. State highway information available at www.drivetexas.org.

Lastly, Fire Departments have provided some safety tips surrounding space heaters and other supplemental heating sources during the colder days:

  • Never leave a space heater unattended or a child unattended with a space heater.
  • Keep all combustible materials (including yourself!) at least three (3) feet away from the heater.
  • Never overload outlets or breakers.
  • Do not use extension cords for the heater.
  • Always turn it off if leaving the room and/or going to sleep.
By |2021-03-19T14:51:49-05:00February 11th, 2021|Archive|

PARDON THE INCONVENIENCE

We are in the process of repairing parts of the trail damaged by the desilting project, subsidence and general wear and tear. Parts of the trail will be blocked off where the repairs are taking place. Please be considerate and avoid the areas that are blocked off. Also, it is a definite safety issue. They will try and complete the project as quickly as possible. Your cooperation will be very much appreciated. We are very enthused to see how many residents are utilizing our trail system. Our goal is to maintain them to the upmost, to ensure your safety and enjoyment.

By |2021-03-19T14:52:05-05:00January 3rd, 2021|Archive|
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